Korean War Comics

BeachheadThis past spring, I took an American history class in which my professor focused on war and popular culture in America.  Instead of using traditional history textbooks, my professor had our class study the different wars in which America has been involved through popular media, and so my class read short stories and novels, played a video game, watched movies, and even read comics about war.  The comics we read were interesting and enjoyable, so I thought I would share a link to them.  The comics are about the Korean War and are available for free on the website History on the Net through this link.  As you read, I invite you to think about some of the questions my history professor told us to keep in mind.  When were the comics written, and what is their historical context?  Who was the original audience?  How do the comics reflect Americans’ views on war?  How might the comics have shaped Americans’ attitudes toward war?  Do the comics present the war and American soldiers in a positive or negative way?  Why?

Happy reading!

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The Peanuts Movie

KiteFrom classic kite scenes to new and creative elements, The Peanuts Movie is a fun film.  The animated children’s movie is well-rounded in character development, story, and humor, for the scriptwriters skillfully craft familiar elements of the Peanuts comic strip into an over-arching storyline that unites the fragmentary comics into a seamless whole.

Football, snow days, Red Baron duels, the Little Red-Haired Girl, and Snoopy’s typewriter all make appearances in the film.  Yet, while The Peanuts Movie alludes to the previous short films with Christmas carolers and pumpkin references, there are many new elements.  For example, there are moments when some little event spirals into a distinctive part of the comics, and when viewers think to themselves, “So that’s how the Red Baron storyline started.”  (Note: As I am not an expert on Peanuts, I don’t actually know how each storyline began, but The Peanuts Movie presents plausible scenarios.)

The Peanuts Movie is more than nostalgia and references to the past, however, for it has its own unique elements.  Charlie Brown becomes a developed and sympathetic character.  In spite of failures, he keeps going, and without realizing it, he’s always achieving and succeeding at what matters most.  While the roles and characters of Lucy and Linus are more downplayed than in past stories, Snoopy and the Little Red-Haired Girl join Charlie on center stage.  Snoopy and typewriterMy impression of Snoopy has always been negative; he seems to be 95% mean and annoying, at least in his roles in the two Christmas short films and in many Peanuts comics I have read.  Although vestiges of these characteristics remain, Snoopy turns out to be a good friend to Charlie Brown and a very imaginative daydreamer.  Finally, the Little Red-Haired Girl has an interesting character.  She has no name, and the audience knows almost nothing about her, yet the scriptwriters gradually reveal that she is sweet and nice—if only Charlie Brown could summon the courage to introduce himself!  But such things are easier written than accomplished, as the movie demonstrates.

In addition to a fun storyline and excellent character development, The Peanuts Movie also has good messages.  Charlie Brown discovers popularity isn’t as important as it seems and doesn’t change who a person is underneath.  As Charlie Brown struggles with what he calls “a serious case of inadequacy,” I appreciate his honesty with himself (“Quotes”).  Too often people promote “self-esteem” and self-confidence over humility, and the movie reminds us that we aren’t always going to be successful or feel “adequate.”  Everyone has Charlie Brown moments, but few people can swallow their pride and face their problems as he does.

Lucy and Charlie“If you really want to impress people, you need to show them you’re a winner,” Lucy advises Charlie at one point in the film (“Quotes”).  In an unexpected twist, Lucy is right, though not in the way she intended.  While Charlie Brown never really loses his chronic inadequacy and tendency to failure, he does show people that he’s a winner: someone who doesn’t give up and who is humble, honest, sympathetic, and kind even when it means sacrifice on his part.  In the end, Charlie Brown does impress people, but not with the kind of success he, or Lucy, would have imagined.

Works Cited

The Peanuts Movie (2015) Quotes.”  IMDb.com.  2016.  Internet Movie Database.  14 Jun. 2016 <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2452042/trivia?tab=qt&ref_=tt_trv_qu&gt;.

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PHD Humor

Created by a PHD student, PHD Humor gives a humorous look into the academic life. Discussing writing papers, Murphy’s law, eating Ramen, and many other topics that most college students on upward will find amusing, Jorge Cham weaves humor into the daily events taking place on a university campus. Great for a quick humorous jolt for your day.

Cheers!

Flint

Comix: for all your Linux comic needs

Comix_ScreenshotWith ereaders and tablets blooming, more and more comic books are moving into digital formats. This week I wanted to share a comic book viewer with you. I recently started messing around in the world of Linux, and discovered a comic book reader called Comix that allows comic book lovers to view .cbr and .cbz files. I haven’t been able to use it extensively, but the software does have some very useful features. One of the features that could come in handy is the “Manga” mode that turns pages right to left. This would be very beneficial since manga is a growing style of comic here in the U.S. Below is a picture of some of the different viewer settings, including the “Manga” setting (second from right):

Screenshot

The software is also very intuitive to use, and provides an immersive reading experience. Although I do not have a picture of it here, Comix does allow readers to enter full screen so that all of the menus are hidden and don’t distract from the reading experience.

Comix1Screenshot

In the coming weeks I plan to test comic readers for Windows and write up a report on those since I know most people don’t run Linux. Do you have a comic reader that you use? If so, let me know which one.

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Credits:

  • Comic Book used in screenshots: Insufferable by Mark Waid (I am not promoting anything on the Thrillbent website. Not all of the comics are child or teen appropriate. Visit at your own risk).
  • Software: http://comix.sourceforge.net/