Cathy: The Comic for Women

cathy-collageMost comics are targeted toward boys.  Some are written for children.  Others are intended for teenagers and adults.  The only comic I have ever found for women, though, is
Cathy
by Cathy Guisewite.

Cathy is a single, working woman plagued by fashion crises, food cravings, trendy diets, and shopping addiction.  These are not the only plagues of Cathy’s life, though.  At times her circle of family and friends are even more bothersome.  Her parents are kind and sympathetic, but Cathy’s mother has a tendency to worry and stick her nose into Cathy’s love life—and life in general.  cathyCathy’s perpetual boyfriend Irving is an inert character who unwittingly spurs Cathy on in her quest for beauty and a slender figure, for Cathy is always trying to win Irving’s attention away from sports on television.  In the early comics, Cathy has a best friend named Andrea.  Andrea is an outspoken supporter of women’s rights and is fond of criticizing the other sex and encouraging Cathy to stand up for herself and attend feminist conventions.  In later comics, Cathy becomes friend with a coworker named Charlene.  They share many experiences together, from shopping trips to love life experiences, such as video dating.cathy-and-video-datingThe last and littlest character is Cathy’s spoiled dog Electra, to whom Cathy often talks, and who sometimes talks back.  Electra often has attitude problems as a result of her pampering, especially after Cathy’s parents take care of her and spoil her even more than Cathy does.

I have read two collections of Cathy comics.  The first was The Cathy Chronicles, a collection of the early Cathy comics that Cathy Guisewite published in the 1970s.  More recently, I read a 1992 collection called Only Love Can Break a Heart, But a Shoe Sale Can Come Close.  The art in both books is idiosyncratic.  Guisewite’s style has an amateur air to it which continues even as she standardizes her way of caricaturing the world and characters of Cathy.  I doubt the comic could have survived on its artwork alone, but the clever dialogue and the quirky pictures create a winning combination.

Author Cathy Guisewite ingeniously uses everyday life to provide her audience with relatable humor that connects well to shared experiences.  The portrayal of women is particularly perceptive.  While I doubt any woman would match all the characteristics Guisewite presents (and I certainly hope no one does), I can spot many similarities to myself and people I know when I read the Cathy comics.  More than the characters, artwork, and storylines, I think this aspect is what makes Cathy amusing and fun to read.

arrietty pic

-ARRIETTY-

Note: I have not read any recent Cathy comic strips, so I don’t know whether the comic has continued to be as good as it was in the ’70s and ’90s.  However, if you’re interested in reading more recent installments, here’s a link to a website that has individual Cathy comic strips.