The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaption

cover

An information-heavy story with substantial narration lifted directly from the actual 9/11 Report, this graphic story by Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón gives an informative glimpse into the events surrounding 9/11–both the terrorist preparations leading up to it and the aftermath. The book concludes with several recommendations on ways the U.S. can improve its efforts to combat terrorism.

While the artwork is inconsistent in quality and the panel layouts are confusing in places, this “graphic adaption” manages to make the 9/11 Report more accessible and easier to grasp. For this, I would recommend this book.

-bone-

Happy First Day of Spring!

For almost two years now, Flint, Bone, and I have been participating on a blog called Thousand Mile Walk with several other writers.  On the blog, we practice our writing skills so that we can grow and improve as writers.  We write essays, poems, short stories, reviews, and other types of compositions on a variety of topics.

Here are some articles from that blog which Flint and Bone have written related to comics.  My comments on some of the stories and movies I have watched and read are in italics.

Graphic Novels

Cardboard

Cardboard by Doug TenNapel – Flint examines the story, artwork, and worldview of a modern graphic novel written for middle grade boys.  This is a really creative book.

Ruse by Mark Waid – Flint reviews a captivating detective story reminiscent of Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories.  I found this book to be well-written and well-illustrated.

Movies and Television

Arrow Season 3

Guardians of the Galaxy – Bone reviews the popular superhero movie released by Marvel.  Guardians is entertaining and lighthearted – even making fun of itself and the superhero movie genre at times.

Arrow – Flint takes a close look at the currently airing superhero television series which is already in its third season.  This is a captivating series where the characters wrestle with difficult questions about what true justice is and what differentiates villains from vigilantes. It’s a good watch for a discerning audience.

Webcomics

Speed Bump

Adam4D by Adam Ford – Flint reviews a digital webcomic that he discovered.

Speed Bump by Dave Coverly – Another comic that Flint found and reviewed.

A Tip for DrawingDrawing tip

Drawing” – Flint gives some pointers on how to improve one’s drawing skills.

I hope you enjoy!

arrietty pic

-arrietty-

Who Watches the Watchmen?

This is a post Bone wrote a few weeks ago at our sister site, Thousand Mile Walk

Thousand Mile Walk

rorschach

First published in 12 issues from 1986 to 1987, Watchmen has long been recognized as one of the greater (if not greatest) graphic novels of all time. So I finally decided to see what all the fuss was about. Written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Dave Gibbons, Watchmen is a dark and twisted tale of competing moralities.

Set in the Cold War era, Watchmen reimagines what the 20th century might have been like in the presence of superhuman protectors. Emerging in the 1940’s-1960’s, these protectors maintained order and even helped America win the Vietnam War.

Now, those heroes not working for the U.S. government are in hiding, and a government-employed hero named “The Comedian” has been murdered in New York City.

Watchmen traces the story of masked vigilante Rorschach and others as they try to determine who killed the Comedian, and why. Not a conventional murder mystery, this tale intersperses flashbacks…

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