Family Insights from “Baby Blues: Gross!”

From prankster brothers and tattling sisters to hijacked fortune cookies and dad jokes, Baby Blues: Gross! by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman brings together the best of the MacPherson family once again.  As it highlights the fun and foibles of family members, this comic collection reminds me why I enjoy Baby Blues so much.  Perhaps the most hilarious moments come not from the kids, as you might expect, but from the parents.  In particular, I think these comics reveal a lot of Darryl’s personality and sense of humor.

Join me on a brief exploration of the comics to understand family dynamics a little better through Baby Blues‘ well of insight.  (Also, for those who are interested in the writer and illustrator’s perspectives, commentary from Scott and Kirkman accompanies most of the comics.)

1. Have you ever wondered why fathers acquire such high-power yard tools?Leaf Blower Manliness

2. Kids’ question of the century and a bit of male psychology.

Brushing Teeth

3. If only pointed word puns could win little girls ponies…but kudos for creativity.

Zoe and ponies

4. Sometimes your own arguments come back to haunt you.Wanda Loses

For more fun, find a copy of Baby Blues: Gross! and keep on reading for yourself.  Additionally, if you are looking for another good collection of Baby Blues, try No Yelling!, which I reviewed here.  I think there is some overlap between the two volumes, but there are plenty of unique comics in each to make them both worthwhile.

Happy reading!

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A Marvel Movie Trio

In the midst of a busy summer, I have managed to explore some new (to me) Marvel cinematic creations.  Here are some of my impressions.

Thor: Ragnarok

Thor-ragnarok-920x518I had wanted to watch Thor: Ragnarok ever since it came out but only just saw it for the first time earlier this summer.  After hearing so many positive recommendations of this movie from friends, you might think my expectations would have been disappointed, but I found Thor: Ragnarok to be as much good fun as I had hoped.  From the opening to the closing shot, the movie is packed with hilarity and adventure.  I think the tone of Ragnarok is reminiscent of the first Thor movie with its comedic flair, in contrast to the more serious Dark World.  Plus, the rock music soundtrack perfectly complements the film and adds to the action sequences and overall humor of the movie.  If you haven’t already, be sure to look up the lyrics to the Led Zeppelin “Immigrant Song” that the movie features as it is surprisingly suited to the characters and story.

Black Panther

Black Panther poster

Black Panther is another movie I had been meaning to watch and had heard positive comments about.  When I finally saw it for myself, I did like it, but I found the character development a bit lacking.  The movie spends too much time on Wakanda’s flashy technology at the expense of the characters and even the plot.  While I admit Wakandan culture and futuristic gadgets are interesting and worth exploring, I feel like focusing on these takes too much time and attention away from more important elements of the story.  Also, I think T’Challa’s antagonist could have been much more compelling; he has a lot of potential but fails to live up to it.  All that said, though, I do like Black Panther as a superhero and think he and Wakanda are a valuable addition to the Marvel cinematic universe.  I especially like the Wakandan “special forces” the Dora Milaje, and I enjoy how the movie pays homage to African culture and traditions.

X-Men: Apocalypse

https_blogs-images.forbes.comscottmendelsonfiles201605X-Men-Apocalypse-launch-quad-poster-1200x903Any movie with an ancient Egyptian villain automatically tempts me to laugh, but ancient mutant En Sabah Nur aside, I enjoyed X-Men: Apocalypse.  As always, the exploration of X-Men characters’ backstories is intriguing, and I appreciate the depth the latest film series has given characters like Raven (Mystique) and Erik (Magneto).  My favorite installations of the latest movies are still First Class and Days of Future Past (in that order), but I think this film shares some of the same worthwhile elements as the first two.  If you can endure the somewhat laughable villain, Apocalypse is another enjoyable and interesting addition to the latest X-Men series.


All in all, my Marvel movie summer has been fun, and I’m glad to have finally caught up on these three films.  Now, I’m ready to jump into the next one I have heard so much about:  Avengers: Infinity War (Bone’s review of this is available here).

Happy viewing!

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Across Five Decades: Old and New Black Panther Comics

Black Panther coverIntrigued by the release of the new Black Panther film earlier this year, I decided to try out some of the Black Panther comics which have preceded it.  I started with the only comic book I could find at my local library that had “book one” in the title, which turned out to be a 2016 rejuvenation of the series.  The slender volume I picked up was Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet, Book Oby Ta-Nehisi Coates..

While I did not find A Nation Under Our Feet particularly coherent or artistically impressive, the comic does provide an intro into the Black Panther world for those who, like me, are curious about the latest superhero Marvel has transferred from comic book to silver screen.  Perhaps the best part of the comic is the last half, which includes a map and history of Wakanda and concludes with a snippet from the very first 1966 comic Black Panther appeared in, where Black Panther features as a character the Fantastic Four encounter.  (Or should I say face?  Black Panther has changed a lot since his first debut 🙂 .)

1966 Black Panther comicIn spite of cartoonish colors and somewhat cheesy dialogue, I found myself enjoying the older comic more than the new one.  The authors (Stan Lee being a prominent one) have a tongue-in-cheek sense of humor and use their powers as narrators to talk directly to the audience.  Further, although the artwork is not nearly as slick as in more recent Black Panther installments, I thought it was laid out well and kept the story easy to follow.  Finally, while certain tidbits—such as asbestos being an innovative material—certainly date the comic, I actually found these aspects to be part of the appeal.

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Wires and Nerve: Gone Rogue

Gone Rogue coverWhat defines someone as human?  Can a personable android actually have emotions and thoughts independent of programming?  With the modern advance of technology, these futuristic questions may soon present themselves.  Whether or not humans face this dilemma, though, the concept is still an interesting one to explore, and science fiction opens up a medium in which authors and audiences can examine the questions in fictional situations.  Although androids and the definition of humanity have been present throughout Marissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles, they have remained side issues until the release of her most recent graphic novel Wires and Nerve: Gone Rogue.

Loveable and loyal android Iko is still on her mission to stop the Lunar wolf soldiers, especially the ringleader Lysander Steele, who are loose and terrorizing Earthens.  Meanwhile, Cinder is trying to improve precarious relations between Luna and Earth and is setting in motion her plan to abdicate the throne and establish a Lunar democracy.  On an Earth which is still recovering from the ravages of disease and war, Emperor Kai plans the annual peace festival that may not be so peaceful thanks to Steele and the wolf soldiers.

With these issues as a backdrop, Meyer uses her graphic novel to discuss challenging questions through her characters.  Confronting Lysander Steele at one point in the novel, Cinder tells him, “[U]ltimately it’s our actions that turn us into monsters.  Just as our actions determine our humanity” (194).  While I disagree that non-humans’ actions can make them human—such as the story seems to argue in Iko’s case—, I do think that actions play a part in identity and what or who we become.  Actions flow from a person’s existing identity and then reinforce it.  Lysander Steele and the other Lunar wolf soldiers turn into the monsters they appear to be because of who they are at heart and their consequent choices and actions, and yet just as humans so often do, they blame their behavior and problems on others, even though all the Lunar government could ever do was alter their outward appearance.  In Gone Rogue, Meyer points out that ultimately, no matter what other people may have done to us or whether we are misfits in society, we remain responsible for our actions.

For those of you who have kept up with The Lunar Chronicles and read the first Wires and Nerve graphic novel, the general elements of Gone Rogue are much the same.  Overall, the story seems a little less polished than the first Wires and Nerve, but mostly in little ways, such as misspellings and confusing action scenes.  I also continue to disagree with some of the portrayals of characters, especially how the Lunar wolf soldiers look (more about that in my review of the first graphic novel).  However, the characters and story remain fun and thought-provoking.  I am still undecided about some of the book’s themes, but I appreciate how Marissa Meyer uses her stories to grapple with the challenging issues of responsibility, love, trust, and identity.

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Avengers: Infinity War

Call me jaded – but the thought of another two-and-a-half hour film filled with superheroic antics did not have me excited. As I mused a long time ago in our Thor: The Dark World review, it’s difficult to create compelling drama when franchise deals guarantee characters’ survival to appear in future films. Do you hear that sound? It’s the sound of all the drama escaping as the film deflates.

This problem is still present in Avengers: Infinity War, directed by duo Anthony and Joe Russo (the Brothers Russo as I shall refer to them): we know that Spiderman will be appearing in an unnamed Spiderman sequel, and we know that the Guardians of the Galaxy will be getting a part 3. So what could really happen?

A lot, as it turns out.

The Brothers Russo seem to be aware of the dramatic pitfalls of serialized adventures and have taken steps to heighten the stakes. Which isn’t to say this film is perfect; but boy, does it deliver on the expectations built up over 10 years, all the way back from the first post-credits scene in Ironman, when Nick Fury tells Tony about the Avengers Initiative.

Well, the Avengers have grown up, and if Infinity War’s principal villain, Thanos (played by Josh Brolin), gets his way and manages to destroy half the population of the universe, the Avengers might have quite a lot to avenge by the time this 2 part movie arc reaches its conclusion.

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*** Mild Spoilers Ahead ***

Infinity War kicks off at the bitter conclusion of a battle between Thanos, aided by his children, and the Asgardians – Thor, Heimdall, Loki, and the rest. The Asgardian ship is half-destroyed, and most everyone dead. In a last-ditch effort, Heimdall teleports the Hulk off the ship, back to earth to warn the Avengers of Thanos’s impending arrival.

This film builds compellingly towards its climax; more the story of Thanos, the destroyer of worlds, than any one other one hero, the film also manages to fit in some interesting character arcs for Star Lord and Scarlet Witch; while there’s only time for minimal development of most of the cast, none of the characters feel shallow or weak as a result. Maybe that’s a result of all the previous films; we only get one scene with Tony Stark and Pepper Potts, but that’s all that the film needs – the audience knows the characters.

The film’s ending is the most surprising part of this superheroic outing, and for me the best part of the film: bold, kinetic, unexpected, utterly devastating while also supremely hopeful. It’s the ultimate cliffhanger, where the filmmakers not only take the heroes to the cliff, but actually throw them off the cliff as well.

The Brothers Russo have rustled up something fresh from the superhero milieu that has been suffocating itself. For this, I applaud them. Is the superhero genre getting long in the tooth? Sure. Might it soon go the way of the Westerns? Probably. But for now, Marvel Studios has once again proved that they still know what makes a good story, and how to tell it in an unexpected way.

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Clever Cartoon Satire

being-there

For the lover of English and word puns

If you’re looking for some clever cartoons, I recommend trying out Wrong Hands by John Atkinson.  I recently discovered this site thanks to a college coworker.  The content of the cartoons ranges from word puns to literary limericks (which humorously summarize the plots of famous literature) to interactive games and commentaries on society and history.  Overall, the cartoons are satirical, but their cleverness makes even the less uplifting ones funny.  Atkinson’s puns and poking fun at famous literary works particularly tickle my fancy because I love reading, writing, and English.  To top it all off, the cartoons are colorful without being garish and have a simple, straightforward style which complements the humor.

For the avid yet critical Shakespeare fan:

literary-limericks-hamlet

For the math nerd:

as-x-approaches-infinity2

For the inner philosopher in everyone:

existentialism

…And the list is endless.  I think you’ll probably find something that makes you smile!

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Cartoons (in order of appearance) retrieved from: “Being There,” “Literary Limericks: Hamlet,” “As X Approaches Infinity,” and “Existentialism.”

Only Love Can Break a Heart, But…

Considering Cathy Guisewite’s obsession with hearts and love, I thought a collection of Cathy comics would make an appropriate Valentine’s Day book review.  Only Love Can Break a Heart, But a Shoe Sale Can Come Close is a collection of Cathy comics from the 1990s.  Love, food, friends, work, and clothes all take center stage in Cathy’s humdrum but humorous life.

Cathy's dilemmaCathy’s best friend Andrea from the earlier comics has moved on and only shows up briefly at the end of the book.  In Andrea’s place is Cathy’s coworker and friend Charlene, with whom Cathy shares relationship and shopping woes and advice.  Irving is still at the center of Cathy’s slow-moving love life, and Cathy jealously competes with golf and Irving’s ex-girlfriend Julia for Irving’s attention.

Cathy and golf.JPGTo the annoyance of all the single women where Cathy and Charlene work, Charlene flaunts her happy relationship with her boyfriend Simon.  However, the envious coworkers enjoy their moments of triumph when Charlene’s happy expectations are occasionally disappointed.  Author Cathy Guisewite reveals in her Cathy comics the funny side of a modern woman’s world of shopping, relationships, and work.

Cathy's work.JPGThis collection of Cathy comics continues to display Guisewite’s witty humor.  Additionally, the artwork in Only Love Can Break a Heart, while still in Guisewite’s quirky and childlike style, shows how Guisewite improved as an artist in the two decades since she first began her comics.

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Note: If you want to read more about the Cathy comics, click here to view my other article on Cathy.