Review: Captain Marvel

Drumming up an original introduction to yet another Marvel movie review requires more effort with each review. What original words can be said about this one that have not already been said in some combination regarding the myriad of predecessors? Has the franchise passed its prime? That is the question I concern myself with, probably too often. Is there an original thread to be plucked, or thought to be explored that hasn’t been already?

This is popcorn fare. Designed to bring crowds to the theater, satisfy the faithful comic-book readers as well as those who casually keep up with the films. Glitz, glamour, extensive action set pieces. It’s practically rote for Marvel films at this point.

And speaking of Marvel, Carol Danvers is Captain Marvel. Through a series of flashbacks, Carol’s story is revealed. It’s a sad, happy tale that includes a not-so-ordinary cat named Goose and a younger Nick Fury, who still has two functioning eyes. This film marks the first time a woman has taken a leading role in a Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) film. This feels less significant in the film than it does on paper, because the movie doesn’t highlight the gender of the main character. I think this is appropriate–the film seeks to tell a good story, free of politicization.

While the story was not bad, I am sad to admit that, other than some well-placed bits of belly-laugh-inducing humor, this movie failed to excite me in a visceral, lasting way. But regardless, it’s a fun popcorn flick. Will I watch it over and over as the years go by? Unlikely. But like the recent glut of Marvel films, if you like seeing movies at the theater, this is another one that feels hand-crafted to pair best with a big screen, a massive sound system, soda, and a bag of popcorn.

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Fairy Tale Comics: Fair or Foul Fare?

Fairy Tale ComicsI was browsing in the children’s section at my local library when a brightly-colored book caught my eye.  Pulling it off the shelf, I saw it was a collection of fairy tales retold as comics.  Curious, I flipped through several pages.  I noticed that a different artist had created each story, leading to a wide variety of artwork and writing styles.  A fan of fairy tales, I was intrigued by the concept and decided to give the book a try.

As with many collections of short stories by various authors, Fairy Tale Comics compiled by Chris Duffy is a mixed bag.  Portions of the comic book fall into the obvious pitfalls that face a work of this sort.  Some of the installments are simplistic in their artwork and narrative, explaining too much of the story with dialogue rather than showing the reader what is happening.  While I can’t know for sure what most young readers would think of these stories, I know I would have preferred regular fairy tales with beautiful illustrations and more poetic writing to oversimplified comic versions.  Additionally, in some of the stories already familiar to most audiences such as Snow White or Hansel and Gretel, the comic retellings lack innovation, causing the story to fall flat.  That said, the brevity of the stories does mean that the bland ones don’t last long, and I think the good tales outweigh the underwhelming ones.  The book includes multiple stories that are well-told and humorous.  These contain artwork that complements the story, interesting dialogue, and fun twists on old tales.  My favorites were stories that I had never heard of before, perhaps because I was not comparing the comic version to some other retelling I had read, but I think they were also genuinely good comic adaptations.  “Puss in Boots,” “The Prince and the Tortoise,” “The Boys Who Drew Cats,” and other stories are a lot of fun and make Fairy Tale Comics a worthwhile read.

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Anime Review: ERASED

Thousand Mile Walk

ERASED is an animé series that tells the tale of Satoru, a 29-year-old failed manga artist who works at a pizzeria. Occasionally, he experiences Revival, where he can go back a few minutes in time (think Next) and change the outcome of recent situations. One day, Satoru experiences an unusual revival that takes him back to his elementary school days, giving him a chance to prevent a series of abductions and murders that happened to several of his classmates many years ago.

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This is one of the most artistically beautiful animés I’ve seen. In addition, it touches on heavy topics such as child abuse and divorce in a way that doesn’t seem heavy-handed.

This 12 episode show is currently available on Crunchyroll and FUNimation in a subtitled version–no English dubbing yet! Rated TV-14 for violence and occasional swearing.

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Comics for Any Time of Year

Assorted FoxTrotAs a new year approaches in just a few hours, I wanted to share a collection of comics that is perfect for any season, from summer to winter and Christmas to Halloween.  Assorted FoxTrot by author and artist Bill Amend features the five-member Fox family.  While the scenario of three siblings, two often exasperated parents, and the travails of school, pranks, and modern life may sound like a rehash of so many family comic setups, FoxTrot brings a fun new perspective to this comic genre.  From cover to cover*, Assorted FoxTrot disperses fresh humor and is a perfect sampling of Amend’s comic strip.  To read the latest, check out the comic at its website, and be on the lookout for a more comprehensive review of the comic in the coming year.

*Literally.  At least in the edition I read, the front and back covers were designed like the packaging on a cereal box, with the characters as ingredients and details like serving size listed on the nutrition label.  Once I noticed the cover design, I thought it was rather clever.

Happy New Year!

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Stan Lee: A Tribute

A 70 year writing career, an estimated net worth of over $50 million, 35 Marvel movie cameos, 121 total acting credits, 69 years of marriage to his wife Joan, and a #1 sense of humor are just some of the statistics that show how impressive Stan Lee was.  While remarkable, though, I knew about other achievements long before I ever discovered those numbers, and Lee’s comics and cameos are why his death has me looking up details about his life.

Stan Lee Civil War cameo

Stan Lee delivering some more of his characteristic humor in Captain America: Civil War

Although I have seen most of the Marvel movies from recent years, I cannot claim to be a truly dedicated Stan Lee fan, having (to my knowledge) only read one comic book he coauthored.  Nor can I rival the lengthy, well-researched bios that dot the Internet in the wake of his death, but I did want to give him a brief tribute.  And that is this: his cameos always made me smile, and the narrative voice I did encounter in the one comic I read had a tongue-in-cheek humor that was charming and timeless.

Entertaining audiences is a special gift, and Lee’s ability to do so makes me think of Donald O’Connor performing “Make ‘Em Laugh,” which claims that everyone wants to laugh and that a comedian who makes an audience laugh is greater than a critically-acclaimed Shakespeare.  Not to disparage Shakespeare, of course, but I do understand the sentiment and enjoy a good laugh like the next person.  In his work, Lee seems to understand that his audiences wanted to have fun and also to be inspired to become superheroes, whether in great or small ways or simply in their imaginations.  I expect Stan Lee will always hold a special place in the hearts of comic book enthusiasts and superhero-smitten audiences, just as he holds a place in every Marvel movie with his quirky personality and signature sunglasses.

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Resources

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0498278/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

http://time.com/money/5452625/stan-lee-net-worth-marvel-universe/

Abridged Classics

Abridged ClassicsIn concept, I like the idea of Abridged Classics, John Atkinson’s short, satirical summary of famous literature.  I am very fond of his web comic Wrong Hands, which I reviewed here, but Abridged Classics is missing many of the characteristics I enjoy on Wrong Hands.  What I like about Atkinson’s web comics are his puns, literary limericks, and creative ways of representing concepts from various disciplines, ranging from mathematics to philosophy.  These jokes are relatable and have a more light-hearted satirical style than Atkinson uses in Abridged Classics.

Because of the subject matter and approach Atkinson has chosen, his comic collection faces a lot of challenges.  Those who are fond of certain books may take offense at his offhand comments.  I have to admit, many of the jokes about books I love fall flat because I disagree with Atkinson’s perspective, and the few details he chooses to highlight marginalize the best aspects or the main point of the stories.  While this may be how satire is supposed to work, I did not find it all that enjoyable.  On the other hand, with the stories one hasn’t read or even heard of, the satire loses a lot of its effect because the jokes are only funny for those who have actually experienced the story or at least know the general plot.  I did laugh at a few of these (such as his summaries of Hemingway novels), but the majority left me confused and unamused.  One of the few situations in which Atkinson’s summaries are funny, at least for me, is when they make jokes about books I have read and disliked, which I am guessing is what other readers would find to be true as well.  After all, most of the jokes we laugh at are ones with which we agree, and because Atkinson’s humor often criticizes the texts, it will only be funny for audience members who don’t like the book or see the same flaws in it which Atkinson points out in his jokes.  I also think that these satirical comics might be more enjoyable in a less concentrated dose because the jokes become a bit tired after you’ve read 10 or 15 in a row.  Mixing in other types of comics might be a good solution to this, mimicking the variety Atkinson provides on his website.

If you are intrigued by the premise of this illustrated satire, you may want to give it a try and decide for yourself if Abridged Classics pulls off the task Atkinson set out to accomplish.  In the meantime, though, I think I will stick with his web comics and wait for him to write—and perhaps publish—additional word puns, literary limericks, and jokes about literature, math, philosophy, and more.

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Family Insights from “Baby Blues: Gross!”

From prankster brothers and tattling sisters to hijacked fortune cookies and dad jokes, Baby Blues: Gross! by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman brings together the best of the MacPherson family once again.  As it highlights the fun and foibles of family members, this comic collection reminds me why I enjoy Baby Blues so much.  Perhaps the most hilarious moments come not from the kids, as you might expect, but from the parents.  In particular, I think these comics reveal a lot of Darryl’s personality and sense of humor.

Join me on a brief exploration of the comics to understand family dynamics a little better through Baby Blues‘ well of insight.  (Also, for those who are interested in the writer and illustrator’s perspectives, commentary from Scott and Kirkman accompanies most of the comics.)

1. Have you ever wondered why fathers acquire such high-power yard tools?Leaf Blower Manliness

2. Kids’ question of the century and a bit of male psychology.

Brushing Teeth

3. If only pointed word puns could win little girls ponies…but kudos for creativity.

Zoe and ponies

4. Sometimes your own arguments come back to haunt you.Wanda Loses

For more fun, find a copy of Baby Blues: Gross! and keep on reading for yourself.  Additionally, if you are looking for another good collection of Baby Blues, try No Yelling!, which I reviewed here.  I think there is some overlap between the two volumes, but there are plenty of unique comics in each to make them both worthwhile.

Happy reading!

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